Ex#1 - Paragraphs can be created by hitting the ENTER key twice

to make the space between paragraphs.

Ex#2 You can indent text by placing a dash and a greater-than sign at the beginning of the line. You can see that this line is indented on the left on every single line. I will make this paragraph a little bit longer by typing nonsense just so you can see what happens when we get to the 3rd and 4th lines. I will make this paragraph a little bit longer by typing nonsense just so you can see what happens when we get to the 3rd and 4th lines. I will make this paragraph a little bit longer by typing nonsense just so you can see what happens when we get to the 3rd and 4th lines.
Ex#3 A hanging indent is different than simple indented text, because the first line is not indented, but all other lines in that paragraph are indented. You can see that in this paragraph. I will make this paragraph a little bit longer by typing nonsense just so you can see what happens when we get to the 3rd and 4th lines. I will make this paragraph a little bit longer by typing nonsense just so you can see what happens when we get to the 3rd and 4th lines. I will make this paragraph a little bit longer by typing nonsense just so you can see what happens when we get to the 3rd and 4th lines.
  • Ex#4
    • Bulleted lists
  • can be made
    • by putting an asterisk (*)
  • at the start of the line.
    • Putting more than one asterisk puts the bullet at a lower level
  1. Ex #5
    1. Numbered lists
  2. are very similar to bulleted
    1. lists but you use
    2. a pound-sign (hash) (#) instead
    3. of the asterisk at the beginning
      1. of the line.

Ex #6 Italics is created by surrounding the text with 2 single-quotes before the text and 2 single-quotes after the text.

Ex #7 Following the same idea, Bold-faced text is created by surrounding the text with 3 single-quotes before the text and 3 single-quotes after the text.

Ex #8 And as you might guess if you want Bold-faced AND italics text you do it with 5 single-quotes before and after the text (2 of them for the italics and 3 more for the bold - it makes sense if you think about it)

Ex #9 You can make what is called monospaced text by using 2 at-signs (@) before and after the text. Sometimes it is hard to see this, but when you put wide letters with narrow letters you can see that this non-monospace wwwwwiiiiiwwwww is quite different from this monospaced text wwwwwiiiiiwwwww.

Ex #10 A simple Link? can be made by surrounding the name of the page with double square brackets. The example in this paragraph points to a page that would be named "Link".

Ex #11 Sometimes you want your Fancy Link? to point at a certain page or URL, but you want something else to display on the page. In that case inside the double square brackets and after the name of the page (or URL) you place a vertical bar and then the text you want to appear. In the example in this paragraph the link still goes to a page named "Link" but the text that is displayed is "Fancy Link".

Headers are good for dividing your page into sections.

Ex #12 You make a top-level header by placing a single exclamation point at the start of the line.

(this is text between headers)

Ex #13 You make a 2nd-level header by placing 2 exclamation points at the start of the line.

(this is text between headers)

Ex #14 You make a 3rd-level header by placing 3 exclamation points at the start of the line. And so on.

Ex #15 You can place a horizontal line across the whole page by putting 4 hyphens at the beginning of the line:


That horizontal line would appear as you see above.

Ex #16 If you want your text to be larger then you surround it with square brackets and plus signs.

Ex #17 If you want your text to be even larger then you surround it with square brackets and double plus signs.

Ex #18 If you want your text to be smaller then you surround it with square brackets and minus signs.

Ex #19 If you want your text to be even smaller then you surround it with square brackets and double minus signs.

Ex #20 Text appearing a bit higher than the rest of the line and a bit smaller is called superscript. You make that by surrounding it with single-quotes and carets (a caret is that little "hat" above the 6 -- it looks like "^")

Ex #21 Text appearing a bit lower than the rest of the line and a bit smaller is called subscript. You make that by surrounding it with single-quotes and underscores.

Ex #22 You cna make text show as underlined (on a web-page this often means someone has changed the text of the page by ADDING this text) by surrounding it with curly braces and plus signs.

Ex #23 You can make text show as crossed out (on a web-page this often means someone has changed the text of the page by DELETING this text) by surrounding it with curly braces and minus signs.

I have now completed more than my 22 examples
but it is also good
to know that 2 back-slashes
at the end of a line
force a new line to start.
You can also use [[<<]] or on the other hand

 you can use (:nl:)
to divide a line into multiple lines.

If you don't put anything to tell pmwiki to divide the lines (no double space in between or double backslash or etc.) then pmwiki assumes you want it all in one line and ignores where you pressed the enter key. This single paragraph, for example, is written with nearly 20 different short lines but they are all combined by pmwiki into just 3-4 lines.

If you want pmwiki to pay attention to where you pressed ENTER then you can put >>pre<< at the top of the paragraph and >><< at the bottom of the paragraph.

  Or, interestingly, if you
  put a space at the beginning
  of each line in a paragraph
  then it keeps the line breaks
  right where you pressed ENTER.
  In that case it also displays
  it in a monospace font.

There's LOTS more you can do with pmwiki as well, but this is a good beginning!